Is your CAD workstation connected to the network like this?

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Posted on March 22, 2016 by Product Support Specialist Mark Lancaster

 

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The other day I had a case where a single computer kept stating it failed to acquire a Vault 2016 license and it did not matter who logged into Windows. No other computer in this company had a problem connecting and working with Vault. Just this individual machine… Unlike CAD (AutoCAD/Inventor) network license where the user is issued the license, the Vault license is granted through the Vault server. So what is the problem here?

Right from the beginning we had pinged the Vault server from this machine and the result was as expected. I also checked with the customer to make sure this machine was not connect via wireless connection but that was not the case either. So I started running different scenarios through my head trying to think of which one is causing the issue. No matter that I thought of, those solutions wouldn’t lend themselves to the problem this customer was having. At a point of running out of ideas, I asked if this machine was connected through a VoIP (Voice over IP phone) device or was it plugged directly into a network jack on the wall. The customer informed me this PC was connected via their phone. I suggested for him to bypass the phone by directly plugging the PC into the wall jack. Sure enough that switch resolved the issue.

Although it is rare, I have seen a few instances where the VoIP phone connection is the actual root cause of odd network behavior and/or the user is experiencing slowness when accessing the files over their network. Even at my last job (when I first came across this issue), I recommend to our IT group that all CAD workstations and major Vault users have a dedicated network connection instead of process the information through the VoIP phone.

With that being said I’m not recommending for you or your company to switch all of your CAD user over to a dedicated network connection just because I pointed out a problem in this article, but if your company does have a secondary network connection at your desk and you are allowed to use, then by all means give it a try and see if there is any difference.

Until next time…

Mark L.

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